互联网,网页游戏,用户体验
  • (转)Don’t compete on features

    2011-07-18

    It’s hard to keep things simple, especially when adding so many new features
    In my recent post on the virtues of marketing simple products, a couple readers wrote in to write a really interesting questions – here’s a particularly interesting one by Mark Hull:

    How do you ensure that by simplifying your product too much, you are not losing a competitive edge by a lack of additional features/functions?

    Every product team struggles with this question- it seems like naturally adding more featureset adds more power to the product, yet at the same time adds complexity that makes it hard for new users to even get started. This is a common problem in the initial version of a product, because most of the time the first version doesn’t work, and the most obvious way to solve the problem is to just keep adding features until it starts to click. Yet does this ever work?

    Don’t compete on features. If your core concept isn’t working, rework the description of the product rather than adding new stuff.

    Make sure you’re creating a product that competes because it’s taking a fundamentally different position in the market. If the market is full of complex, enterprise tools, then make a simpler product aimed at individuals. If the market is made up of fancy, high-end wines, then create one that’s cheaper, younger, and more casual. If the market is full of long-form text blogging tools, then make one that makes it easy to communicate in 140 character bursts. If computers are techy and cheap, then make one that’s human and more premium. These ideas are not about features, these are fundamentally different positions in the market.

    BMW is the Ultimate Driving Machine
    My favorite example of differentiated market positioning in a very crowded market is BMW’s “Ultimate Driving Machine” slogan. It’s not just a marketing message, you know it’s true when you sit inside a BMW and turn on the engine. Among other things, you’ll notice that:

    • The center console is aimed towards you, the driver
    • The window controls are next to your stick so it’s easier for your right hand*
    • … and obviously the remarkable driving experience

    Furthermore, when you go to the dealership, the entire experience keeps reinforcing the “Ultimate Driving Machine” message. The point is, the positioning is about the driving experience and the engineering to back that up.

    In a price and features comparison, it’s unlikely that BMW would ever come on top- it’s expensive, and very little of the money goes into the interior and niceties that you’d expect out of a Mercedes. Yet people end up buying BMWs not for the features, but because it’s a fundamentally different car than a Mercedes (or at least it feels that way).

    I’ve always felt that Apple goes this way too, where their products are more expensive and often do a lot less than competitive devices, yet win because they have a more cohesive design intention across their whole UX. Again, the idea here is more about competing via a differentiated positioning rather than based on a feature checklist.

    You’ll never win on features against a market leader
    The other important part to remember is that for the most part, if there’s a winning product X on the market, you’re unlikely to win by creating the entire featureset of X+1 by adding more features. Here’s why:

    • First off, that’s crazy because you have to build a fully featured product right away, and that might already take years to match a market leader
    • Secondly, as described in the Innovator’s Dilemma, if you’re mostly copying the market leader and then adding features, those features are likely to be  sustaining innovations that is likely on the incumbents roadmap already- by the time you’re done, they’ll either have it or just copy you

    Instead, the idea is to have a simpler product that attacks the low-end of the market leader’s product by taking a completely different market positioning. That way, you don’t have to build a fully featured product and you can take a completely different design intention, which leads to a disruptive innovation.

    Ramifications for startups building initial versions of a product
    I think there are three key ramifications for teams building the first version of a product.

    The first is: Don’t compete on features. Find an interesting way to position yourself differently – not better, just differently – than your competitors and build a small featureset that addresses that use case well. Then once you get a toehold in the market, you can figure out what to do there. This doesn’t mean that new features are inherently bad, of course- they are fine, as long as they support the differentiation that you’re promising.

    The second thing is: If your product initially doesn’t find a fit in the market (as is common), don’t react by adding additional new features to “fix” the problem. That rarely works. Instead, rethink how you’re describing the product and how you deliver differentiated value in the first 30 seconds. Rework the core of the experience and build a roadmap of new features that reflects the differentiated positioning. Avoid add-ons.

    The third is: Make sure your product reflects the market positioning- this isn’t just marketing you know! If your product is called the Ultimate Driving Machine, don’t just slap that onto your ads and call it a day. Instead, bring that positioning into the core of your product so that it’s immediately obvious to anyone using it- it’s only in that way your product will be fundamentally differentiated from the start.

    * UPDATE: An astute reader, Greg Eoyang, pointed out that the modern generation BMWs (E90s) are different now- I have an E46 that’s a few years old, so I was basing my observation on that. He writes:

    First of all, a most modern BMWs do not have the window controls near the stick, that’s like 2 generations old, they are on the windows just like Honda’s these days.  BMW doesn’t even tell you about a lot of the features that have been standard for a long time – such as speed variable volume on the radios – Wide Open Throttle switch (back in the non-CPU days, it cut off the air conditioner when you floored it) – They have improved the concept of a car which is more than the features.

    Thanks for the additions Greg!

    Author:NARKU | Categories:互联网 | Tags:
    Comments Off on (转)Don’t compete on features
  • 转-产品的成功学

    2011-06-19

    最近 知乎上有人问到:

    俞军 提出的有关产品经理提出的12条军规,你赞同多少?

    我把这12条,打乱原有的顺序,重新整理为两个部分,有利于阅读和思考:

    产品观

    1、产品经理首先是用户,站在用户角度看待问题

    发现用户的需求,而不是创造需求

    把用户当作傻瓜,不要让用户思考和选择,替用户预先想好

    用户是很难被教育的,要迎合用户,而不是改变用户

    关注最大多数用户,在关键点上超越竞争对手,快速上线,在实践中不断改进

    用户体验是一个完整的过程

    给用户稳定的体验预期

    不要给用户不想要的东西,任何没用的东西对用户都是一种伤害

    方法论

    追求效果,不做没用的东西

    决定不做什么,往往比决定做什么更重要

    如果不确定该怎么做,就先学别人是怎么做的

    ———–

    2年前我刚看到这些内容时,曾大呼过瘾,感觉面前忽然开了一扇门,阳光柔和地打在脸上。

    也有点像初中时躲在小树林看卡耐基的成功学,看得热血沸腾,俨然打了鸡血,激动到面红耳赤地想做些什么。

    看成功学的后果是,5分钟冷静下来后,发现你身边的世界一点也没改变,你依然是那颗螺丝钉,在庞大的社会机器里,沿着既有不变的轨迹运转。

    诚然,俞军作为曾经百度产品的掌门人,值得所有做互联网产品的人尊敬,刚开始做产品时,有人告诉你什么是对的,首先你就应该庆幸,全盘吸收,因为跟随一个优秀的人,一路做下来至少不会太差,这是产品入门的重要一步。

    有过一定的产品经验后,我在知乎上的回答是:

    1.做一件事情,首先要有世界观,这12条是俞军总结的,未必适合你,适合你的产品模式、你的用户情景

    2.参考别人的世界观,多数情况下对自己没有任何益处,知道越多,成见越深,所以,保持好奇心,警惕世故

    3.有了想法,就去做,去验证,总结自己的方法论,最后发展出自己对于产品的世界观,并且,不要分享,至少不要这样赤裸裸地扔出12条。

    真的特别想分享,憋不住,要有实战、数据、例证,这样对别人才有益。

    俞军还有一些值得分享的观点,详细见这里

    Twitter的产品故事

    最近关注的另一个人物是,Twitter的3位创始人之一,杰克.多西。在斯坦福大学的一次演讲中,他提到了Twitter成功的3个阶段,相比俞军总结的12条,似乎更值得分享。

    1. 画出你的好点子

    把你的点子从大脑中提取出来,画在纸上(杰克曾展示了一张Twitter的早期草图)——笔尖接触纸张的过程,也是检测和重新定义想法的过程,最重要的是,你开始与别人分享。

    Twitter的点子,来源于多西从小就痴迷于地图、城市信息的可视化和实时流动,他自学编程以模拟城市的人流,这是没有任何产品观时的好奇心驱动。

    2. 识别环境是否成熟

    早在2000年,多西就画出了twitter的草图,并写出程序模拟城市运转,但他的城市里没有人的存在,只是些会跳跃和流动的点。

    之后,他有了黑莓手机,开发出简单的程序,通过写邮件分享自己的动态,遗憾的是,当时短信服务还没有兴起,其他人无法实时接收到他的信息,好点子出现在错误的时间,再次被搁置。

    直到2005-2006年,美国的短信服务大范围普及,各运营商之间不再有壁垒,twitter的实时分享成为可能,Twitter诞生。

    3. 让用户参与建设

    从最初的创意到发展至今,Twitter所经历的种种变化和用户的建议密不可分,包括采纳@符号,RT,都是在用户直接需求驱动下的产品设计。

    当然,作为产品的把关人,你首先要做好的编辑,从工程师、用户、支持者获得的想法和建议,会不断地冲击我们应该做的事,编辑需要找到一两件至关重要的事情,能推动网络、服务、产品的持续发展。

    转载文章:

    增加外链:http://www.scmusic.net 四川音乐学院

    Author:NARKU | Categories:互联网 | Tags:
    Comments Off on 转-产品的成功学
  • 细节时间黑洞

    2011-05-12
    在最早的时候产品设计大多采用瀑布模型方式做迭代,上一个流程完毕之后才进入到下一个流程。这种模式有一个最大的好处就是下一个流 程的准备相对充分,但是缺陷也显而易见,那就是迭代成本太大且显得笨重。随着互联网行业的发展,“快”成了这个行业最重要的一个口诀,于是类似“唯快不 破”成为大受追捧的产品设计哲学。于此同时,很多项目的设计周期被缩短。

    在这个快字的指导下我们省去了对详细MRD的撰写,采用了列出功能点的方式向研发团队讲述整个产品的逻辑与核心需求点;因为要快速,所以我们采用初 略原型的方式直接像工程师展示我们需要的产品架构和页面逻辑;因为要快所以产品人员在描述的时候很激昂的描述了我们要做的高优先级系统,并且说这些系统是 我们最至关重要的地方,我们高优先级先把这些重点搞通;研发人员在听完整个的需求描述与初略的原型之后迅速做出评估,给出研发排期,于是群情亢奋的就开始 干了……

    这一切看上去很美好,不是吗?我们比以前快多了,我们也有突出的重点了。但是事情真的是这样吗?

    当大体的排期做完了,需求也通过了。下面研发人员开始做后端的架构和程序逻辑的架构了,产品人员开始对之前的需求做梳理,对原型做细化,设计师也开始尝试视觉风格了。这次我们采用了并行的方式,我们要比之前进步多了吧。

    很多时候,事情就是这样奇妙,不梳理不知道一梳理吓一跳。原来当时我们在考虑展示部分的时候没有考虑到不同的用户流导向的页面不一样啊;原来一个简 单的数据提交过程有如此多的分叉口并导向不同的后端数据处理策略。产品人员认为,这些都是应该重新归纳出来的,于是之前一个展示页面被细分为N个不同的展 示样式;之前的一个提交流程被分拆成M个不一样的处理策略。挨个模块的这么梳理下去之后原来简单的一个原型被弄的好生完美,原来一个看似美好的页面结构被 修剪的异常丰满。而之前产品人员认为“比较简单,重点突出”的系统被证明是一个很复杂的很重的系统。当然,这个过程是后端工程师和产品设计师共同梳理完 成。

    这个时候,问题出现了。按照之前的需求描述和原型讲解研发工程师预估的时间在每个系统上都多出来了一倍多。产品人员在不断的“完善”页面逻辑和产品 架构,研发工程师在不断的增加研发成本。最终,当研发周期过去大半的时候我们发现,靠!刚做完第一个阶段…..于是,大家都急了,咋办?!砍功能吧,把低 优先级的东西先干掉,先做“核心”的事情。一阵的手忙脚乱之后,还是比预期的晚了几周,上线了一个勉强过的去的版本。

    那么,在这个案例中整个产品研发过程的问题出在哪?自我反思,我认为是产品人员造成“细节黑洞时间”过长,导致工程师对研发过于乐观,项目开发周期评估失常。不过,问题的症结还是在于快的过头了,因为快所以忘记了一些虽然笨重但仍旧行之有效的方式。

    在需求的初期,产品人员并没有能够很好的将业务逻辑转换成产品逻辑。整个业务的核心链条是什么?用户被什么动力所驱动,这些动力在产品上由什么来体现?围绕这个核心链条哪些是我们必须要做的产品模块?

    业务逻辑的转换凌乱必然导致产品大的架构凌乱。按照我个人的习惯,在任何一个产品甚至产品模块开始之前都需要先画一张产品架构图,这个架构图会存在 在MRD的最前面和原型图的最前面。这样有2个好处,产品自己可以很好的梳理整个产品的结构及每个支点如果有风险会影响的范围;需求被传递的时候下一个流 程能够先很清晰的有所认知。

    当大的产品架构出来之后接下来要做的事情是按照每条支线模拟一遍流程,使用流程图的方式来做,每个模块都需要。一般的处理方式是直接用相关的页面原 型来走流程图,每个页面的下一个页面是什么,有几个支线,分别导向了什么页面。这样走一遍之后就能最大程度的避免“细节时间黑洞”。

    是的,就是这样,因为要快,所以我们在赶进度,我们忘记了产品逻辑,凌乱了产品架构,忽视了页面流。这部分时间在排期的时候被忽略了,而这就是个大大的细节时间黑洞,这个黑洞影响着我们每一个产品。如果在研发过程中,我们发现之前的逻辑是错误的,那么问题将更加严重……

    当然,这个案例中提到的情况还是相对可控的,因为产品人员有相对独立的控制权。如果再有权力高层掺合进来,不断的增加功能,不断的释放需求,那么,整个产品研发过程将更加糟糕了

    Author:NARKU | Categories:互联网 | Tags:
    Comments Off on 细节时间黑洞
  • 本能的交互设计(转)

    2011-05-06

    最近,同事爷爷八十岁高寿,他送了台Ipad。我们都笑他自己太潮,这高科技的玩意爷爷怎么会接受。没想到他说:“爷爷拿起就使,玩愤怒的小鸟、Tom猫、听歌都妥妥的。”

    这真真是个很奇怪的现象: 为什么ipad无论老人小孩都会用,基本操作甚至很少需要别人的协助和说明书!

    究竟是孩子容易接受电子产品?还是电子产品容易让孩子接受?

    这不仅让我思考,什么样的设计才能“童叟无欺”,老人、孩子都可以流畅使用。那么,交互设计不该是“精英化”的,更该是“傻瓜式”的,去追求一种更“本能”的操作,就像吃饭穿衣一样简单。

    如何才能让设计理解成为“用户的本能”?
    1、理解你的用户

    要把用户看作崇尚简单的、挑剔的、迟钝的、很忙的:能少键入就少输入,能少点击就少点击,能少思考就少思考。

    而产品则要做个好好先生:做到体贴的、温暖的、宽容的、有安全感的、易理解好沟通。有些时候为不给用户不必要的干扰,很多压力和责任都要后台默默的扛起来。

    2、充分理解、引导用户的行为流

    一方面要了解用户可能的点击流程,做到让用户每一步到下一步都随心所欲;另一方面产品要有良好的信息架构,操作引导要高逻辑,但要好理解。

    对于整个操作的完成,需要有引导说明,让用户知道自己完成到哪里,还需要什么。

    除此之外,要方便用户返回、后退、反悔、回到起点。
    3、易理解的表达

    易理解的表达不仅包括视觉和文字,交互操作也要做到透明,引用臭鱼的总结就是:

    • 操作前,结果可预知。
    • 操作时,操作有反馈。
    • 操作后,操作可撤销。

    当然,一些交互操作主要需要靠更外一层视觉元素的支持。

    GUI设计师和一般视觉设计师或平面设计师最大的不同在于设计的图案要有某些交互行为的暗示作用。比如,Ipad上扳动的按钮就要让用户有向哪里扳动的行为暗示。而很多pc产品直接抄袭未免不符合触屏用户直接用手操作的使用习惯。关于更多的视觉语言隐喻可以移步到 《聊聊图标的信息传达》

    产品说明语言也应当是简练、容易理解并且友好的。文字是一种理解的力量,当苹果推出Macintosh的时候,乔布斯要求用户手册写得非常易懂。他的团队说“我们尽力了,手册只需要高中三年级水平的英语。”乔布斯说:“不行,要小学一年级水平的也能读懂。”文化不一定是衡量标准,但是产品语言绝不可咬文嚼字、故弄玄虚或者繁复华丽。

    有时候,用户越是表面使用简单的产品,仅仅是冰山一角,背后则需要孕育更复杂的逻辑。看似简单容易的交互操作也需要设计师更缜密的思考和用研反复的用户测试。

    本能的设计简言之就是最大化地以用户心智模型为出发,使用共识或易学易用的操作,让用户少点思考、少点疑惑、少点费事。

    总之,为了“本能的设计”,我们要付出更多努力,更多思考。

    转载文章:http://www.zhangyq.com/instinct-design-interaction-design/

    文章外链:四川音乐学院

    Author:NARKU | Categories:互联网 | Tags:
    Comments Off on 本能的交互设计(转)
  • 25种我在10秒内离开你的页面的原因

    2010-12-11

    是什么让人们在打开你的网页没多久就按下返回键?他们为什么那么快就想摆脱你的网站?可以做些什么来改善这一点呢?

    长期思考这个问题之后,我发现了比原本想象的还要多的一些因素。

    如果把一下因素单独考虑的话,可能还不至于让访问者产生迅速离开的冲动,但是如果这些因素掺杂在一起的话,却足以留给访问者一个足够坏的印象,让他们马上离开。

    让用户在你的网站有个愉快的体验并不是件容易的事情。实际上大多数网站都会多多少少有些问题。但是看看下面这些负面因素并努力避免,或许可以对于做出更有用户黏性的网站有好处。

    来,从最糟糕的开始说吧……

    1. 自动播放的声音。这真让我发狂。如果我访问网站时候立马遭到不想听的不必要的杂音的轰炸的话,我就想马上离开。接受这种自动播放声音的广告的发布者是最糟糕的发布者,(他们本可以拒绝这样的网站的,就像我一样),常见于酒店行业网站。

    2.弹窗。 老问题,大问题。因为我们视线里面,它从未消失。如果你想用弹窗弹我,那我就想被弹窗直接从你网站弹开算了。你越早用弹窗弹我,我越早离开。如果弹窗只显示半分钟一分钟,而且内容还能算是有用的话,还能稍微忍受一下。

    3.插入式广告。 我不再访问福布斯网站的原因就是那儿插入式广告太多了。一周消息不如改名叫一周插入呢。没有人喜欢等待,但这跟期望的东西有差距。当我点击一个链接的时候,心里希望的是能直接被带到我点的那个网页,而不是被扔到一个挂着个大大的广告牌的页面。

    4.分页。 看十张配着小标题的挺小的图片,你真的需要我连点十下翻十页么?或者翻十页只为了看个明明可以在一页内显示的前十名排行榜?分页在我看来就是个人为提高点击率的低级伎俩。这种伎俩的存在,同时证明了在线广告的衡量和购买标准都是错误的。而且这也让很多站长都跑偏了——本应着重于内容的精力,都放在认为提高点击率上了。

    5.缓慢的载入。 谁都不愿意等!我为我的50兆带宽付了那么多钱,可不是为了让你的慢死人的网页搞坏我的情绪的。如果我真心要看看你的网页,或者我真的必须看你的网页,或许还真的就那么等着。但是我要是只是好奇,或者手抖多点了一下到了你的网站,那我等不了几秒就闪了。

    6. 对于广告的优化大于对内容的优化。这让人不爽的程度简直就跟漫长的载入时间一样。有些站长为了赚广告费,把广告的载入顺序优化,先载入广告后载入网站内容。有些时候是当我们等待着广告成功载入的时候,导航栏在整个网页出现之前快速载入,然后一切都卡住了。总结一下这条,站长尤其要留意缓慢的广告服务器加上一个缓慢的网页的时候,所产生的神奇效果。

    7. 糟糕的导航栏。 作为一个职业网页设计师,设计糟糕的导航栏是少数能说得上来的致命伤之一。导航需要的是直观,描述的清晰,直来直去。基于Flash的网页往往是最糟糕的那些。

    8.结构混乱。(Poor scent trails不知道该怎么翻译了……)嘿,我就是想找到我的问题的答案而已。如果我不能快速有效的找到我想要的,我就去别的地方看了。你的工作就是要帮助人们过滤出他们需要的信息。这就是为什么存在优化和测试这种事。
    9. 关键信息的擅离职守。我最近访问了霍克斯顿酒店的网页,想知道在那里开个房得多少钱。找了几分钟之后我发现没有关于房费的信息。(呃,反正我没找到)。这太奇怪了。顺便说一句,我不可能就为了想知道房费多少,去点“订房”的。我不如直接去泽塔特酒店订个房。

    确保基本信息在你的网站上都有。
    10. 过早的要求注册。为嘛?为嘛现在就得注册?连一点甜头都不让我尝么?时机非常的重要。

    11. 太多闪烁的滚动的玩意儿。 我在上网,并没有在我唯一能忍受到处是闪烁不停的灯光的夜店里。是的,又闪又滚是能抓人眼球,但总把人抓疼。这些东西绝望的想要引起人注意,同时又绝对的讨人厌。有个需要注意的特例是,有的人还就是好这口,只要是这样的风格他都爱!

    12. 拼写错误。 错误拼写和错误语法会给访问者不好的印象。这种事情真的没有借口。只要多用些心在细节上,啥都有了。如果你不在意你的网站,你的访问者会怎么想?

    13.垃圾字体。 你使用的是宋体?真哒?它很丑的啊。 尽管如此吧,至少你用的不是漫画体。正常人不会纯粹因为一个网站字体好看与否而离开的,但是丑陋的字体会给人留下你对你的网站不上心的印象。这种印象再加上这个列表上的其他负面因素,可能就足以让本想在你网站待一待的人拔脚就走了。

    14. 网页很窄。 还有为800像素宽度的显示器设计的网站呢,让我起鸡皮疙瘩。你不觉得?

    15. 左对齐网站。 重申一下——我不知道具体该怎么解释——左对齐网站(相对于居中对齐)看起来太过时了,起码在我看来。我不知道为啥,但总能注意到这些东西,而且我不觉得这是好设计。说到豌豆上的公主……(译者不明白这个该怎么翻译了……)

    16. 俗套的网站。有些网站我看着真是喜欢。事实上我希望所有的网站的标准化,按照最经典的指南手册设计。但是如果网页设计都一样的话就行不通了。谁会想要作为一个模仿者出名呢?

    17. 年久失修。 我希望在首页上能看到博客或者新闻板块,能看到这网站还在更新的迹象。显示个标题和日期就够了。如果我看到最新的新闻日期是2004一月,那我可能立马就看别的网页去了。

    18. 主题模糊。 访问网站的时候我希望是看一眼就能看出来这网站是干嘛的。有时候我挠头一分钟都看不出来网站是干嘛的。一行简单明白的描述就够了。

    19. 术语/行话。 我觉得你可以私下里来这套。

    20. 浏览器不兼容。三天前,微软刚刚在Xbox Live客户服务领域拒绝了对于谷歌浏览器Chrome的支持。这是个多方面的错误,特别是我还是个付费的Xbox Live用户。浏览器错误真是各种大小各种型号。测试,测试,测试,找出你的用户喜欢的感觉。尽量避免插手于浏览体验,比如说在新窗口打开链接。

    21. Flash。 有时候我会在Flash多的网站多呆一会儿,就像是路上有车祸把我堵在那里一样。但是大多数时候我就是简单的点一下返回键。我了解了一些Flash网站, 几乎可以肯定地说,没有像样的。我只有在很特殊的情况下忍受这种网站。在这方面我是个强硬派。

    22. 没有“关于”页面。 有些网站好像对“关于”页面过敏似的,我压根想不出来这是为什么。有时候我访问网站就是为了找到有关某些公司的更多的信息而已,看到没有“关于”页面的时候,真是万念俱灰。

    23. 只有视频的主页。 用视频来介绍公司,或者用来解释某种具体的产品或者服务是一种新的趋势,特别是对于新公司。如果有空我还能看个三分钟的小短片,但是我觉得你总得配合点文字吧,更快捷,对网站的搜索优化也有好处。

    24. 很傻很业余。有的网站没有活力,没有个性,就是个穿着制服的模子。其他人好像远远的超过了你的网站的境界,而你都不知道怎么赶上。这两方面都会是你的网站的后腿,把你的访问者往外推。

    25. 配色失败。糟糕的配色会让你网站上的内容很难读。而如果你的网站读都不能读的话就更别想着别人会在你网站上待着了。

    各种各样的原因让人们在还没有真正了解一个网站的时候就把网页直接关掉了。

    那么我少说那种了?你是为什么离开一个网页的?

    来源:http://article.yeeyan.org/view/tuo1234567/157290

    Author:NARKU | Categories:互联网 | Tags:
    Comments Off on 25种我在10秒内离开你的页面的原因